Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis

Research Highlight

Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design

Zhi Wei Seh, Jakob Kibsgaard, Colin F. Dickens, Ib Chorkendorff, Jens K. Nørskov and Thomas F. Jaramillo

With a rising global population, increasing energy demands and impending climate change, major concerns have been raised over the security of our energy future. Developing sustainable, fossil-free pathways to produce fuels and chemicals of global importance could play a major role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions while providing the feedstocks needed to make the products we use on a daily basis. One prospective goal is to develop electrochemical conversion processes that can convert molecules in the atmosphere (e.g., water, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen) into higher-value products (e.g., hydrogen, hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and ammonia) by coupling to renewable energy. Electrocatalysts play a key role in these energy conversion technologies because they increase the rate, efficiency, and selectivity of the chemical transformations involved. Today’s electrocatalysts, however, are inadequate. The grand challenge is to develop advanced electrocatalysts with the enhanced performance needed to enable widespread penetration of clean energy technologies.

This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performance. By examining the common principles that govern catalysis for different electrochemical reactions, we describe a systematic framework that clarifies trends in catalyzing these reactions, serving as a guide to new catalyst development while highlighting key gaps that need to be addressed. We conclude by extending this framework to emerging clean energy reactions such as hydrogen peroxide production, carbon dioxide reduction, and nitrogen reduction, where the development of improved catalysts could allow for the sustainable production of a broad range of fuels and chemicals.

Science  13 Jan 2017, Vol. 355, Issue 6321, 
DOI: 10.1126/science.aad4998

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6321/eaad4998